Q:

How far is Pluto from Earth?

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Quick Answer

Pluto is about 2.6 billion miles from Earth, according to About.com. That distance is approximately 30 times greater than the distance between the Earth and the sun.

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How far is Pluto from Earth?
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Full Answer

Pluto is considered a "dwarf planet," according to NASA, because it is too small to move other objects out of its way. Pluto is 1,400 miles wide, which is about half the width of the United States. NASA also refers to Pluto as a "plutoid," a term that describes dwarf planets that are farther away than Neptune. Pluto orbits the sun, but, unlike most planets, the orbit is more elliptical in shape than circular, and the sun is not in the center of the orbit.

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