Q:

How fast does the Earth spin?

A:

The Earth rotates at about 1037 miles per hour at the equator, and the speed at the North Pole and South Pole is near zero. The speed of the Earth's rotation increases when approaching the equator and decreases toward the poles.

The circumference of the Earth is about 24,901 miles along the equator, which explains why one full revolution of the Earth takes approximately 24 hours. The speed difference between the poles and the equator creates the Coriolis effect, which has an effect on Earth's weather. The Coriolis effect determines whether storms rotate clockwise or counter-clockwise. Earthquakes, storms and tides can increase or decrease Earth's rotation slightly.


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