Q:

How fast does the Earth spin?

A:

The Earth rotates at about 1037 miles per hour at the equator, and the speed at the North Pole and South Pole is near zero. The speed of the Earth's rotation increases when approaching the equator and decreases toward the poles.

The circumference of the Earth is about 24,901 miles along the equator, which explains why one full revolution of the Earth takes approximately 24 hours. The speed difference between the poles and the equator creates the Coriolis effect, which has an effect on Earth's weather. The Coriolis effect determines whether storms rotate clockwise or counter-clockwise. Earthquakes, storms and tides can increase or decrease Earth's rotation slightly.

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Related Questions

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    How fast does Jupiter spin?

    A:

    Assuming the rotation speed is measured at the equator, Jupiter rotates at 28,273 miles per hour; however, its polar regions move slightly slower, which is possible due to Jupiter's gaseous composition. Jupiter makes one full rotation in just 10 hours, and these 10-hour days make Jupiter the solar system's fastest spinning planet.

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  • Q:

    How long does it take the Earth to complete a spin on its own axis?

    A:

    It takes Earth 23 hours, 56 minutes and 4.091 seconds to completely rotate on its axis compared to the background stars. This amount of time is known as a sidereal day.

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    Does the North Pole have land under its ice?

    A:

    There is no land under the ice at the North Pole because the North Pole is located in the middle of the Arctic Ocean. The ocean is mostly covered by ice sheets about 6 to 10 feet thick, which expand during autumn and winter and shrink during summer.

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    Where can you see the aurora borealis?

    A:

    The aurora borealis is normally only visible from within 20 degrees of latitude of the North Pole. In North America, most viewing opportunities are limited to those in Alaska or the extreme northern parts of Canada. However, solar flares and geomagnetic activity can vastly increase the size of the aurora borealis, making its lights much more active and visible to much of the United States.

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