Q:

What are fault lines?

A:

Quick Answer

Fault lines are where faults in the Earth's crust intersect with the top surface of the Earth. A fault on the Earth's crust is generally a crack that makes up the boundary between the planet's various tectonic plates. Faults can be classified as either active or inactive.

Know More

Full Answer

An active fault line is defined as areas where the Earth's crust moves over a period of time. This movement can generate earthquakes. Fault lines that are inactive show signs of previous crust movement but are relatively static in nature. Fault lines on the Earth's crust can appear as a normal dip-slip fault, a reverse dip-slip fault or a strike-slip fault.

Learn more about Earthquakes

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Where does the energy released by fault movement form?

    A:

    The energy released by fault movement is formed from the motion of the tectonic plates that make up the Earth's crust. As the plates move, they rub against each other and become stuck, where energy is stored until they slip apart and cause an earthquake.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the epicenter of an earthquake ?

    A:

    The epicenter of an earthquake is the point on the surface of the Earth directly above the point in the crust where a seismic rupture occurs. This origin point within the crust is called the hypocenter or focus.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where do most earthquakes take place ?

    A:

    The circum-Pacific seismic belt, often referred to as the Ring of Fire, experiences more earthquakes than anywhere else on Earth. The belt stretches from the southern tip of the Americas north to Alaska, across the Bearing Strait, down through Japan and into New Zealand.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is seismology?

    A:

    Seismology is the study of waves of energy, especially earthquakes, that move through and around the Earth. These waves of energy are called seismic waves, and the scientists who study them are called seismologists.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore