Q:

When is the first day of autumn?

A:

Quick Answer

The first day of autumn falls on the autumnal equinox, which varies in date from Sept. 22 to Sept. 23, depending on the year. An equinox is when there is an equal amount of daylight and darkness in a day.

Know More
When is the first day of autumn?
Credit: FilippoBacci Vetta Getty Images

Full Answer

After the autumnal equinox, the daylight hours grow shorter, and the amount of dark hours each day grows greater. Autumn ends on the midwinter solstice, which falls on Dec. 21 or 22. The midwinter solstice is the day with the most dark hours in one 24-hour period and is the first day of winter. During the winter season, the daylight hours grow longer until it becomes spring on the vernal equinox.

Learn more about Months & Seasons

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What month is fall?

    A:

    Fall, also known as autumn, lasts for three months and, in Western cultures, begins on the September equinox in the Northern hemisphere and the March equinox in the Southern hemisphere. Fall is noted for harvests, cooling temperatures, shorter days and the start of the holiday season in the West.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many months have 31 days, and how many have 28?

    A:

    February is the only month in the year to have 28 days. There are seven months that have 31 days and four months that have 30 days.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What happens in summer?

    A:

    The hot weather that occurs in summer is caused by the Earth's axial tilt, which affects how much sunlight different parts of the Earth experience throughout the year. During summer in the northern hemisphere, that half of the globe is tilted 23.5 degrees toward the sun, increasing both the length of the day and the amount of time the sun has to warm the surface.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do seasons change?

    A:

    The change in seasons is caused by the varying angle of the Earth's tilt from one part of the year to another. A common misconception is that the change in seasons is due to the Earth's slightly elliptical orbit bringing the planet closer to the sun in summer, but, as About.com notes, seasons are different in the northern hemisphere and the southern, which are the same distance from the sun.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore