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What are five examples of heterogeneous mixtures?

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Quick Answer

Beach sand, air with clouds, oil and vinegar, granite and pizza are five examples of heterogeneous mixtures. This is because they all have components that stay separated when put together.

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What are five examples of heterogeneous mixtures?
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Full Answer

A mixture is generally defined as at least two or more substances that mix together but do not become physically bonded. They are able to be compatible with each other while not fusing together. A mixture generally occurs when two things are added into one location and are agitated to mix together. A mixture must also be able to be separated without the use of other chemicals to be considered a true mixture.

A heterogeneous mixture is essentially a mixture that does not become one substance when mixed together. All parts of the solution stay separate, and properties of each solution do not cross boundaries at all. Most mixtures, both heterogeneous and homogeneous, vary differently from each other whether there is an equal ratio or not. Heterogeneous mixtures tend to vary more than homogeneous ones.

Homogeneous mixtures differ from heterogeneous ones because they are more uniform throughout. They generally mix evenly and do not separate from each other the way that heterogeneous ones do. The human eye is generally not able to tell the difference between the substances that are in a homogeneous mixture.

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