Q:

What are fun facts about archaebacteria?

A:

Archaebacteria include many unique characteristics and traits: they comprise one kingdom of living organisms, are among the oldest life forms on earth and prefer to live in the most extreme environments on the earth to name a few. Archeaebacteria are often grouped with eubacteria, although the two are quite distinct. Archaebatecteria predate eubacteria by millions of years and are more closely related to eukarya than actual bacteria.

Archaebacteria have some of the most unusual cell structures of all living microbial organisms. Their cell walls lack peptidoglycan, which makes them unable to perform the important task of breaking down sugars and other substances to give living creatures the fuel and energy they need to survive. Archaebacteria thrive in the coldest and hottest regions on earth: they congregate en masse in the semifrozen Arctic waters around the North and South poles and can be found in droves within cliffs and domes of scorching hot deserts. Archaebacteria might look menacing when placed under slides and examined with microscopes, but unlike eukaryotes and other bacteria, the kingdom of archaebacteria does not include a single malicious organism. These humble single-celled organisms are among the oldest inhabitants of earth: they appeared while dinosaurs still roamed the earth and survived natural events and dramatic climate changes that exterminated their more glamorous peers.

Sources:

  1. microbeworld.org

Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    Where do archaebacteria live?

    A:

    Archaebacteria, more properly called archaea, are single celled organisms that live in a wide range of habitats, including the harsh conditions of hot springs. Thermophiles are arachea which grow best at temperatures above 45 Celsius, but some species thrive in much warmer temperatures. According to Reference.com, "Methanopyrus kandleri Strain 116 grows at 122 °C, which is the highest recorded temperature at which any organism will grow."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What do archaebacteria eat?

    A:

    Some archaebacteria are photosynthetic, meaning they make their own food; however, rather than use the pigment chlorophyll like green plants and algae, they employ a light-sensitive purple protein called bacteriorhodopsin. Other archaea live in places where no sunlight penetrates, such as deep-sea thermal vents. These bacteria rely on a process called chemosynthesis to make ATP.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do archaebacteria move?

    A:

    Archaebacteria move by using a form of flagellum to propel themselves. This structure vaguely resembles a tail coming off the organism, and an archaebacterium rotates it rapidly, like a boat propeller, to move.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are characteristics of archaebacteria and eubacteria?

    A:

    The main characteristic of archaebacteria and eubacteria are that they are unicellular, or single-celled. Archaebacteria are only found in hot boiling water or other types of extreme environments, while eubacteria are found all over.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore