Q:

What is the function of a lysosome?

A:

Lysosomes are cell components that contain enzymes designed to digest food particles by breaking down proteins. They rid cells of internal and external waste. They also dismantle dead cells through a process called autolysis.

A lysosome's acidic enzymes result from protein production caused by ribosomes. A protective membrane around the lysosome contains the enzymes, which are powerful enough to damage or kill the cell. The membrane also allows lysosomes to bond with and destroy foreign particles in the cell, including bacteria and other microbes. Large numbers of lysosomes are present in the kidneys and liver, the organs responsible for waste elimination in the body.

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    A:

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