Q:

What are gale force winds?

A:

Gale force winds are 34 to 40 knots on the Beaufort wind scale. Strong gale force winds are 40 to 47 knots. Winds above 47 knots and below 64 knots are storm winds. Sixty-four knots and above are hurricane force winds. Near-gale force winds are 28 to 33 knots.

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Near-gale force winds cause whole trees to sway and pedestrians to feel air resistance. Gale force winds in the ocean cause waves of 18 to 25 feet. On land, they can break twigs off trees. Strong gale winds create waves that are 23 to 32 feet high in the ocean and cause slight structural damage on land.

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