Q:

How does glycerin strengthen bubbles?

A:

Quick Answer

Glycerin strengthens the bonds of molecules in bubbles so that they can stretch further. Bubbles generally do not last long and will burst immediately when they come in contact with another object.

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Full Answer

Bubbles are made of a very thin layer of fluid that forms a sphere around a pocket of air. A bubble made from pure liquid, such as water, is not very stable and will be hard to form. Adding soap or glycerin allows the bubble to become more stable and last longer. Glycerin is thick, clear and odorless, which helps the sphere of the bubble to be thicker.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between glycerin and glycerol?

    A:

    Glycerin and glycerol are two different products although they can be confused as being one and the same. Glycerol is the byproduct of the manufacture of biodiesel, which is made from animal fat or soybeans. In its raw state, glycerol can be converted into vegetable glycerin. If the glycerin is approved by the U.S. Pharmacopeia, it is typically used in beverages and food.

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  • Q:

    What is glycerin USP?

    A:

    Pioneer Thinking explains that glycerin is a sweet-tasting, colorless, thick liquid. SRS International explains that USP-grade glycerin is pure enough to be used in foods, cosmetics, personal care items and pharmaceuticals.

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  • Q:

    What are some uses of glycerin?

    A:

    Glycerin, also known as vegetable glycerin or glycerol, is commonly used as topical medication for various skin conditions, including eczema, xerosis and keratosis, states Health Central. Glycerin is also used as a food additive and substitute for alcohol in herbal infusions.

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  • Q:

    What is vegetable glycerin?

    A:

    Vegetable glycerin, also known as glycerol, is a plant-based oil produced from soybeans, palm kernels and coconuts, according to Global Healing Center. PubChem explains that cottonseed and olive oil also yield glycerol. These aforementioned vegetable oils yield more glycerol than animal fats found in lard and tallow. Glycerol is found naturally in all animal and vegetable cells as lipids.

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