Q:

Into what group would humans be classified?

A:

Humans, along with every other living organism, are classified as members of several groups, each nested within higher classifications. Humans are technically classed as Homo sapiens, with Homo being the genus humans belong to and sapiens as the species name.

Homo sapiens are hominids of the family Hominidae and the superfamily Hominidaea. Above these groups, humans are members of the suborder Anthropoidea along with other apes. Humans and other apes are members of the order Primate. All primates are placental mammals, and all mammals are tetrapods. All tetrapods are vertebrates, and all vertebrates belong to the phylum Chordata. Above the phylum level, humans are classed as animals and eukaryotes.


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