Q:

What happens during telophase I of meiosis?

A:

Quick Answer

During telophase I of meiosis, the chromosomes decondense and cytokinesis comes to an end. Cytokinesis refers to the division of the cytoplasm, which results in two haploid daughter cells at the completion of telophase I.

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Full Answer

Meiosis I begins with prophase I, which is when the most important processes occur. During this substage of meiosis I, the chromosomes and the centrioles move to opposite sides of the cell. The nuclear membrane also begins to dissolve during prophase I. The chromosomes go through the process of "crossing over," which allows them to exchange genetic material, enhancing genetic variety.

After metaphase I and anaphase I, telophase I occurs. In some species, the chromosomes decondense during this substage. Decondensation typically does not occur if the cell undergoes rapid meiosis. At the end of this substage, there are two haploid daughter cells. Haploid means that a cell contains a complete set of chromosomes.

At the conclusion of telophase I, the cell enters meiosis II. This process consists of prophase II, metaphase II, anaphase II and telophase II. The primary difference between telophase I and II is that there are four haploid daughter cells present at the conclusion of telophase II instead of the two haploid daughter cells present at the end of telophase I.

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