Q:

How do you get a hunchback?

A:

Quick Answer

The National Osteoporosis Foundation explains that people with osteoporosis often break bones in the upper spine, causing a hunchback. Changes in posture are called kyphosis, and some people who suffer from kyphosis suffer from constant pain, because the muscles, ligaments and tendons of the back become stretched and strained and the spine becomes more curved, according to The National Osteoporosis Foundation.

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Full Answer

Also known as hunchback or round back, kyphosis is a condition wherein the spine in the upper back has too much curvature, Healthline explains. The spine’s thoracic region (i.e. upper back) normally has a slight natural curve, and the natural curve of the spine helps absorb shock and support the head’s weight, according to Healthline. Healthline explains that kyphosis occurs when the spine’s natural arch is bigger than normal, and people with kyphosis have a visible hump on their upper back, which often appears round or protruding from the side. Additionally, those with hunchback look like they are slouching. Due to the extra pressure kyphosis brings on the spine, it often causes pain in the back. Moreover, it causes breathing difficulties because of the pressure it puts on the lungs, according to Healthline.

Jason C. Eck explains on MedicineNet that the typical symptoms of an abnormal kyphosis include poor posture with a hunchback, stiffness, muscle fatigue and back pain. Most of the time, these symptoms are constant and do not worsen over time. However, in severe cases, the kyphosis becomes progressively worse and causes a more exaggerated hunchback, according to MedicineNet.

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