Q:

Where does hydrogen peroxide come from?

A:

Quick Answer

Hydrogen peroxide can be manufactured in a number of different ways, but the most common methods involve the reaction of oxygen with isopropyl alcohol and anthraquinone. Some of the uses of hydrogen peroxide include as a bleaching agent and in the manufacture of other chemicals.

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Full Answer

Hydrogen peroxide also has antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make it useful for a variety of medical and cosmetic purposes. However, the chemical has to be severely diluted for uses, as solutions containing more than 8 percent hydrogen peroxide are corrosive to the skin.

Most commercial grades of the chemical contain somewhere between 35 and 90 percent hydrogen peroxide in a solution of water and trace amounts of stabilizers.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Does hydrogen peroxide kill mold?

    A:

    Hydrogen peroxide is widely used as a DIY treatment to kill mold. It's a strong oxidizer and is listed as a popular mold treatment by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. It's not known which, if any, species of mold are resistant to hydrogen peroxide.

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  • Q:

    Is hydrogen peroxide safe for the teeth and gums?

    A:

    Hydrogen peroxide is safe for teeth and gums, and it is commonly used as a whitening agent in toothpaste or on its own, according to HowStuffWorks. People also use a combination of baking soda and hydrogen peroxide as a form of toothpaste.

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    Is hydrogen peroxide flammable?

    A:

    Hydrogen peroxide is non-flammable, however it can support combustion, so should still be kept away from direct heat sources or other flammable materials. It is a colorless liquid with a pungent smell and is chemically stable at room temperature.

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  • Q:

    What reacts with hydrogen peroxide?

    A:

    Hydrogen peroxide can act as an oxidizing or reducing agent at different pH values, enabling its reaction with both metals and nonmetals, such as iron and fluorine respectively. Hydrogen peroxide is highly oxidizing in acidic solutions, outranking halogens and halogen compounds, such as fluorine and chlorine dioxide, in oxidation potential.

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