Q:

How do you identify pictures of wild berries?

A:

You can identify pictures of wild berries by focusing on the shape, color, amount of visible seeds, type of plant and appearance of the plant leaves. The appearance of the leaves is one of the most reliable ways to identify wild berries.

Pictures do not always show the precise shape or color, but most berry plants have very distinctive leaves. The U.S./Canadian border has the largest selection of wild berries, due to the amount of snow that falls in that area every year. The most popular berries are blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, cranberries and strawberries, which can all be found in most local grocery stores.

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    A:

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    A:

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