Q:

What are immiscible liquids?

A:

Immiscible liquids are liquid solutions that do not dissolve in one another. They are liquids that do not mix in equal proportions. Immiscible liquids can be described using chemical terms.

In chemistry, when two liquids mix together, they can be classified as miscible or immiscible. In miscible liquids, the bonds that are holding each separate liquid together must be broken and new bonds must be formed. When this occurs, the two liquids mix together in equal proportions and mix completely. Immiscible liquids are the opposite. Their bonds are not broken in order to form new bonds, and the two liquids will not form one cohesive solution. An example of an immiscible liquid solution is oil and water.


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