Q:

What kind of volcano is Mount Vesuvius?

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Quick Answer

Mount Vesuvius is a complex stratovolcano, according to Live Science. Stratovolcanoes produce violent eruptions due to the increase in gas pressure from the thicker lava and cooler magma than many other volcanoes. Like other stratovolcanoes, Mount Vesuvius has a proportionate mix of lava and pyroclastic forms, ash and other rocks.

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Full Answer

The formation of Mount Vesuvius dates to the collapse of a previous stratovolcano, Somma. Other stratovolcanoes include Mount Rainier, Mount Fuji and Mount St. Helens. Stratovolcanoes often form on top of one another in domes and collapse. Mount Vesuvius is famous for its eruption and subsequent destruction of Pompeii in 79 A.D.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What kind of volcano is Mount Fuji?

    A:

    Mount Fuji is a classic cinder cone, built up by a stratovolcano. The mountain is notable for its symmetrical cone-shaped profile, which is characteristic of stratovolcanoes that have not erupted laterally. Oregon State University notes that Mount Fuji has erupted over 16 times.

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  • Q:

    How old is Mount Vesuvius?

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    Mount Vesuvius is approximately 17,000 years old. It formed upon the site of a previous volcano. Vesuvius has a long history of eruptions, beginning with the first known eruption in 5960 B.C.

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  • Q:

    When was the last time Mount Vesuvius erupted?

    A:

    Mount Vesuvius' last eruption was in March of 1944. The eruption destroyed the villages of San Sebastiano al Vesuvio, Massa di Somma, Ottaviano, and part of San Giorgio a Cremano.

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  • Q:

    What type of volcano is Mount Hood?

    A:

    Mount Hood is a stratovolcano, which typically have sharp peaks that are formed from coats of dried lava, volcanic ash and other volcanic elements. Mount Hood's formation specifically is the result of a subduction zone on the West Coast.

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