Q:

When was the last time Mount Etna erupted?

A:

Quick Answer

As of June 2014, the last time Mount Etna erupted was January 2014. The eruption was the first of the year 2014 and was caused by formation of a new crater on the southeastern volcano that resulted from the 2013 eruption.

Know More

Full Answer

The latest eruption was not as explosive as the previous eruptions. It was milder compared to the gigantic fountains of lava that previous eruptions produced, especially in 2013. This eruption produced a flow of lava from the new southeast crater that snaked down the slopes of the mountain. Mount Etna is among the world's most active volcanoes and is in a nearly constant state of activity.

Learn more about Volcanoes

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What damage did Mount Etna cause?

    A:

    Mount Etna has destroyed numerous towns since its first recorded eruption in 122 B.C., including the towns of Nicoli, Catania and Zafferana. In addition to destroying towns, the volcano has caused thousands of fatalities and caused environmental damage to farmland and the environment.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What caused Mount Etna to erupt?

    A:

    Mount Etna erupts and is active because it lies on the subduction fault boundary between the African and Eurasian tectonic plates as well as the fault between the African and the Ionian microplate. The Ionian plate is tilted backward, allowing space for mantle magma to well up to the surface.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many times has Mount Etna erupted?

    A:

    Mount Etna has erupted over 200 times since its first noted eruption in 1500 B.C. Mount Etna is the largest and most active volcano in Europe.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    When was the last time Mount Unzen erupted?

    A:

    The last eruption of Mount Unzen happened in 1995 after a series of at least 10,000 pyroclastic flows that persisted between 1991 and 1994. The worst eruption during this period happened on June 3, 1991 and killed 43 people, including French volcanologists Katia and Maurice Krafft.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore