Q:

When was the last time Mount Etna erupted?

A:

As of June 2014, the last time Mount Etna erupted was January 2014. The eruption was the first of the year 2014 and was caused by formation of a new crater on the southeastern volcano that resulted from the 2013 eruption.

The latest eruption was not as explosive as the previous eruptions. It was milder compared to the gigantic fountains of lava that previous eruptions produced, especially in 2013. This eruption produced a flow of lava from the new southeast crater that snaked down the slopes of the mountain. Mount Etna is among the world's most active volcanoes and is in a nearly constant state of activity.

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