Q:

What is the length and width of an acre?

A:

Historically, an acre is 66 feet by 660 feet. However, an acre is a measurement of area, so the length and width can vary as long as the total area is 43,560 square feet.

660 feet is one-eighth of a mile, also known as a furlong, which is the length oxen can pull a plow without resting. A land is 16.5 feet wide or 10 down and back trips along the furlong with a standard 10 inch wide plow. A farmer could reasonably plow two lands in the morning, and two lands in the afternoon, which totals the acre measurement. An acre was historically the area of land a farmer could work in a day.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between an acre and a hectare?

    A:

    One hectare is defined as 10,000 square meters, whereas 1 acre is 4,840 square yards. There are approximately 2.47 acres in 1 hectare. Hectare is a unit of measurement in the International System of Units, while acre is a unit used in the English language.

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  • Q:

    What are the dimensions of an acre?

    A:

    Because an acre is an unit of area measurement that equals 43,560 square feet, the dimensions of its sides are measured in feet. However, the shape of an acre of land can be a rectangle, square or other shape. If an acre is rectangular in shape, then the width in feet multiplied by the length in feet must equal the area of 43,560 square feet.

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  • Q:

    How big is 1 acre?

    A:

    One acre is equal to 0.0016 square miles. The value is also equivalent to 4,840 square yards, 43,560 square feet, 0.004047 square kilometers or 4,046.86 square meters.

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  • Q:

    How big is a quarter of an acre?

    A:

    There are 43,650 square feet in an acre, so a quarter of an acre is one-fourth of that, or 10,912.5 square feet. Since there are 4,840 square yards in an acre, a quarter-acre is also defined as 1,210 square yards of land.

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