Q:

How long can the sun keep burning hydrogen at its core?

A:

Scientists believe the sun has enough hydrogen to burn for another 5 billion years, according to Space.com. It is approximately 4.6 billion years old, so the sun has used up about half of its hydrogen since it was formed.

The sun creates its power through a nuclear fusion process that turns hydrogen into helium. This process occurs in the sun's core where the temperature is an incredible 15 million degrees. This gas giant is the center of the solar system. It does not have a solid surface like Earth does, which allows some parts of the sun to rotate at different speeds than other parts.


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