Q:

How long does Jupiter take to orbit the sun?

A:

It takes Jupiter 4,332 days or 11.86 Earth years to orbit the sun. Because it is further away from the sun than Earth, it's orbital period is much longer.

While the average orbit of earth is around 150 million kilometers from the sun, Jupiter's orbits 778 million kilometers from the sun—a colossal difference. Interestingly, Jupiter is tilted only 3.13 degrees on its axis, so it does not experience different seasons like Earth. Jupiter is the fastest rotating planet in in the solar system, rotating one complete time in just 9.97 hours. Jupiter is located anywhere from 893 – 964 million kilometers from the earth — its distance from the Earth changes each day as the planets move about on their course through the galaxy.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is Jupiter's revolution time?

    A:

    Jupiter's revolution time is 11.86 Earth years, or 4,332 days. The planet's lengthy revolution time is due to its distance from the sun. In addition to being further away from the sun than Earth, Jupiter has a different physical composition and magnetic field.

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  • Q:

    Which planet is closest to Jupiter?

    A:

    No one planet is always closest to Jupiter, as the range between Jupiter and the other planets varies depending on its position in orbit. The closest approach Jupiter is capable of making to another planet is with Mars, at a minimum separation of 551 million kilometers.

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  • Q:

    How do the moons of Jupiter stay in orbit around Jupiter?

    A:

    According to NASA, Jupiter has 50 officially recognized moons and 17 provisional moons, all of which are held in orbit around the gas giant by its immense gravity. The four largest of these moons are known as Galilean satellites, and the innermost three of them have fallen into a peculiar orbital resonance with each other.

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  • Q:

    What do all the planets have in common?

    A:

    In order to be declared a planet, a celestial body must meet the following qualifications: It must orbit the sun, it must maintain a nearly spherical shape and have the necessary mass for self-gravity so that it does not succumb to rigid body forces, and it must clear the neighborhood around its orbit. All recognized planets in the solar system meet this definition.

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