Q:

How long does it take the moon to orbit the Earth?

A:

Quick Answer

The Earth's moon takes 27 Earth days to completely orbit the Earth. A day on the moon is also equal to a little over 27 days on Earth.

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How long does it take the moon to orbit the Earth?
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Full Answer

The moon circles around the Earth at an average distance of 238,855 miles along an orbit with a circumference of 1.49 million miles. It traverses its orbit at around 2,287 mph, moving about 0.5 degrees in relation to the stars every hour. At their closest point, the distance between the Earth and the moon is 225,623 miles, while at their farthest, the two are separated by 252,088 miles, a difference of 26,465 miles.

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Related Questions

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    How long does it take the Moon to complete one revolution around the Earth?

    A:

    The Moon revolves around the Earth every 27 days, 7 hours and 43 minutes. This time period is known as a sidereal month. It is measured by following the Moon's position in relation to distant stars that remain in fixed positions in the sky.

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    How was the moon formed?

    A:

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    Why do we always see the same face of the moon?

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    Why do we only see one side of the moon?

    A:

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