Q:

How long is the sun expected to keep burning?

A:

Quick Answer

Scientists expect the sun to burn for another 5 billion years. However, just because the sun continues to burn does not mean that Earth necessarily remains habitable.

Know More

Full Answer

Scientists of astronomy believe that after 2 to 3 billion more years, the sun's radiation has the potential to increase so dramatically that it ends life on planet Earth. Five billion years from now, the sun's hydrogen core may be depleted, causing the sun to expand greatly as a Red Giant. From that point on, it could engulf the planets all the way up to Mars before continuing its multiple-billion year death. After this, the bloated sun may collapse into itself as a White Dwarf that is roughly the size of Earth.

Learn more about Our Sun

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the difference between sunset and dusk?

    A:

    Sunset is the exact time the upper disk of the sun is at the horizon, whereas dusk is when the center of the sun is 18 degrees below the horizon, according to the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The hazy twilight in between sunset and dusk is caused by the scattering of sunlight in the upper atmosphere that gives the horizon a light blue appearance.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the four outer layers of the sun?

    A:

    The four outer layers of the sun are the photosphere, chromosphere, transition region and corona. The photosphere is directly observable, and it is the deepest layer of the sun.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How long does it take the sun to set once it touches the horizon?

    A:

    Once the sun touches the horizon, it takes approximately 2 to 3 minutes to go below the horizon. This is dependent on several factors, including latitude, time of year and atmospheric thickness.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How did the sun get its name?

    A:

    The sun has had multiple names over the centuries, including the French word "soleil," the Latin term "sol" from the ancient Romans and "helios" from the ancient Greeks. However, after Germany coined the term "sonne," the word translated into English became "sonne" and later just "sun," according to NASA.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore