Q:

What are the major dangers of earthquakes?

A:

The major dangers of earthquakes include other hazardous effects that could occur after an earthquake subsides, such as liquefaction, tsunamis, further ground tremors and landslides. By being aware of these dangers, in the event that they occur, it is possible to get to safety faster.

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Liquefaction is the process of the ground melting down to a liquid state after an earthquake, according to the Cascadia Region Earthquake Workgroup or CREW. After liquefaction, the ground may no longer be solid, which puts buildings and other foundations at risk.

Tsunamis typically occur after an earthquake and may cause massive waves due to the reverberations of the earthquake, according to scientific resource GNS Science. If a volcano erupts, this can also cause a tsunami. During tsunamis, it is best to get as far away from the ocean as possible, as the waves are typically far larger than normal and thus can cover more ground and cause more damage.

Even after an earthquake ends, ground tremors may still persist, CREW notes. This could cause even more harm to areas already damaged by an earthquake. If ground tremors occur after the earthquake, it is best to stay in a safe place until they subside.

Naturally, with so much shaking occurring, portions of rock or ground can begin to slough off and fall, causing landslides. Rock falls may also happen, according to GNS Science. In the event of a landslide, it is best to be as far away from large rock formations or tall hills and cliffs as possible.

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