Q:

How do you make a tornado model?

A:

Quick Answer

According to UCAR, Center for Science Education, to make a tornado model you need an 8-ounce jar with a lid, water, vinegar, clear liquid dish soap and a pinch of glitter. UCAR provides instructions for constructing the model.

Know More

Full Answer

First, fill the jar three-quarters full of water. Next, add in 1 teaspoon of vinegar and 1 teaspoon of clear liquid dish soap. Then, add a pinch of glitter. Lastly, close the lid and twist the jar to swirl the contents. A vortex like the swirling winds of a tornado forms in the center of the jar. Due to the water's friction against the glass wall, when the jar is being twisted, the water inside against the glass is pulled along while the fluid on the inside takes longer to move. Eventually, both the glass jar and the contents spin as you rotate the jar. However, when you stop rotating the jar, the contents inside continue to spin. A small tornado can be seen for a few seconds when the outer fluid slows down and the inner fluid continues to spin rapidly. While real tornadoes happen in the air, this vortex is made in water. However, both air and water are fluids and move in similar ways, as stated by UCAR.

Learn more about Storms
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What happens during a tornado?

    A:

    Tornadoes form out of thunderstorms, where moist air rises, cools and condenses into clouds that release heat and force cooler air back down. If the updrafts are strong enough, the feedback loop forms an air vortex that continues to shunt more moist air upwards and eventually forms a tornado.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How wide can a tornado be at the ground?

    A:

    The widest tornado ever recorded by the National Weather Service was 2.6 miles in diameter. It occurred in El Reno, Okla., in 2013. Tornadoes this wide are quite rare, as it is difficult for tornadoes to sustain their momentum as they grow.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What damage does a tornado do?

    A:

    The damage a tornado can do varies on the size, strength and location. A mile-wide tornado with 200-mph winds can level an entire town, whereas a small tornado with 80-mph winds in an unpopulated area may cause no damage at all.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Has anyone survived a tornado?

    A:

    There are numerous recorded instances of adults and children who have been physically lifted by a tornado and survived the experience. One case involved a young boy who was wearing a bike helmet when a 2011 tornado in Joplin, Mo. enveloped him.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore