Q:

How many bones are in the human foot?

A:

There are 26 small bones in the foot. There are seven tarsal bones and 14 phalanges. In the ankle area there is a cuboid bone, navicular bone, cuneiform bone, calcaneus, and a talus.

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Full Answer

The 26 bones of the foot are responsible for balance and propulsion. The bones also support the weight of the human body, allowing activities such as walking, running and standing, and providing both flexibility and strength. There are many ligaments that hold the bones of the foot together and provide further flexibility to the bones. These ligaments limit extreme movements that would cause dislocations of the bones.

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