Q:

How many days does a full moon last?

A:

According to NASA, a full moon technically only lasts for the moment when the Earth is directly between the sun and the moon. However, full moons appear to last for approximately three days.

Over the course of approximately 28 days, the moon goes through different phases based on the relative positions of the Earth, the moon and the sun. A true full moon only occurs during the instant when the moon appears completely illuminated to observers on Earth. However, when most people talk about the full moon, they are referring to the several-day period when the moon appears to be at least 95 percent full.

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    How close does the moon get to the Earth?

    A:

    The moon travels in an elliptical orbit, and at perigee, the closest it gets to Earth, it stands about 225,623 miles, or 363,104 kilometers away.

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    How often do lunar eclipses occur?

    A:

    Lunar eclipses occur two to four times each year. Lunar eclipses only occur during full moons, but because the orbit of the moon is tipped five degrees relative to Earth's orbit around the sun, not every full moon results in an eclipse. When an eclipse does occur, it's visible to everyone on Earth's night side.

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    Why does the moon turn orange?

    A:

    Dust, smoke and pollution particles diffuse moonlight through the atmosphere to make it appear orange, red or yellow as the heavenly object rises or sets above the horizon. The atmosphere is thicker when viewing objects along the horizon rather than overhead, which also makes objects appear redder and larger. NASA calls this a moon illusion because the moon never actually changes color.

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    Why is the moon called a natural satellite?

    A:

    A moon is considered a natural satellite because it orbits around a planet. A natural satellites is any celestial object that orbits around another larger object.

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