Q:

Does Mars have seasons?

A:

Quick Answer

Mars experiences dramatic and uneven seasons throughout its year due to its pronounced axial tilt and somewhat elliptical orbit. The axial tilt ensures that the seasons in the northern hemisphere are different from those in the south, and the eccentricity in Mars' orbit makes season length variable.

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Full Answer

Just like Earth, Mars experiences four seasons – winter, spring, summer and fall – but the annual cycle of seasons takes 1.88 Earth years. The longest season on Mars, according to Universe Today, is the northern hemisphere's spring. This occurs when Mars' northern hemisphere is inclined toward the sun and the planet is about midway between the closest and farthest points in its orbit. This season lasts seven months. The shortest season on Mars is the northern hemisphere's winter, which lasts approximately four months.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    Why doesn't Venus have seasons like Mars and Earth do?

    A:

    Because Venus has an axial tilt of only 2.7 degrees, it lacks the seasons found on both Earth and Mars. Venus also has a very thick atmosphere and suffers from a runaway greenhouse effect, meaning that the surface of the planet experiences no temperature variations whatsoever.

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  • Q:

    What is the distance between Mars and the Sun?

    A:

    According to NASA, Mars is about 142 million miles from the sun. A day on Mars is slightly longer than 24 hours, and the planet takes 687 Earth days to orbit the sun.

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  • Q:

    Who discovered Mars?

    A:

    Because Mars with its famous red coloration is readily visible from Earth, it is unknown who first discovered it; NASA lists the planet as "known by the ancients." There are records of its existence as far back as ancient Egypt.

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  • Q:

    How much would you weigh on Mars?

    A:

    How much people weigh on Mars varies according to how much they weigh on Earth. Someone who weighs 160 pounds on Earth would weigh 59.5 pounds on Mars, according to the Athena Mars Exploration Rovers page hosted by Cornell University.

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