Q:

What is the medical term for toes?

A:

Quick Answer

The medical term for toes is phalanges, which is plural, and phalanx when referencing a single toe. The term was coined by Greek philosopher Aristotle 384-322 .B.C. Phalanges also refers to fingers.

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Full Answer

Each foot consists of five phalanges, or toes, that are connected to longer bones called the metatarsals. The big toe is made up of two bones, which form one joint, while the other four toes are comprised of three bones and two joints. In total, the foot has 26 bones and 33 joints, all of which are connected by over 100 muscles and tendons, which add to the foot's strength and flexibility. The foot is a resilient structure that can withstand great pressure due to its complex design.

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