Q:

What is the melting point of beeswax?

A:

Beeswax has a melting point of approximately 143 to 147 degrees Fahrenheit. It has no fixed melting point because the composition varies from one wax to another. Once beeswax is heated above 185 F, its color changes to brown and it loses its aroma.

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Full Answer

Beeswax is a natural wax produced by honeybees in their bee hives. At first, beeswax is white in color, but becomes yellowish later as pollen and other compounds mix with it.

Beeswax is currently used in a wide variety of ways. It serves as a coating agent in medicine because it preserves active ingredients for a long time. It is also used in cosmetics to help solidify emulsified solutions.

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