Q:

What is a metalloid?

A:

As the name suggests, metalloids often possess properties that true metals hold. In addition to these, metalloids also have non-metal properties. They are able to conduct electricity and heat, like metals, but not as well.

Metalloids also have a shiny metal appearance and can be used in alloys. Just like most non-metals, metalloids typically share a brittle structure and exhibit nonmetallic general chemical behaviors. Some materials like carbon fall into the stair-shaped pattern on the table and are sometimes considered metalloids.

The term metalloid refers to a specific group of elements on the periodic table: boron, silicon, arsenic, germanium, polonium, antimony and tellurium. The elements form a stair-like shape on the right side of the table.

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