Q:

What is a model in science?

A:

A scientific model is a conceptual, mathematical or physical representation of a real-world phenomenon. A model is generally constructed for an object or process when it is at least partially understood, but difficult to observe directly. Examples include sticks and balls representing molecules, mathematical models of planetary movements or conceptual principles like the ideal gas law. Because of the infinite variations actually found in nature, all but the simplest and most vague models are imperfect representations of real-world phenomena.

The ideal gas law is an excellent example of a model, in terms of both their usefulness and imperfections. It states that, within any particular volume of a gas at a particular temperature and pressure, the number of gas molecules or atoms can be exactly calculated, regardless of the actual composition of the gas involved. However, it is called the ideal gas law for a reason. It assumes uniform conditions throughout the given volume of gas, a condition that can almost never actually be met. Bodies of gases in the real world, even within sealed containers, have variations in temperature and pressure, along with accompanying currents. Similarly, the equation for the volume of a sphere gives a good approximation for the volume of roughly spherical objects, but no perfect spheres are likely to exist in actual nature.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What is the biopsychosocial model?

    A:

    The biopsychosocial model is an interdisciplinary model that assumes health and wellness are affected by a number of psychological, biological and sociocultural factors. The BPS model was first published in the journal Science in 1977 by psychiatrist George L. Engel. In light of his model, there was a dramatic shift in focus from disease to health and in considering how psychosocial factors affect illness and disease.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you build a 3D model for a cell biology project?

    A:

    There are many fun and creative ways to approach making a 3D model for a cell biology project, such as fashioning a classic styrofoam model or making one with a bed pillow or even edible ingredients. Always select a nucleus for the cell that is easy to work with.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How could a person become a mutant?

    A:

    A person can become or be considered a "mutant" when genetic variations in the DNA are prominent and result in a physical representation of their condition. Most humans currently exhibit some gene variations that would be considered a mutation, though the majority are not noticeable.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the theme of Philip Larkin's poem "Toads"?

    A:

    The theme of Philip Larkin's poem "Toads" is a discussion of how people trade their passion for work in the name of money. "Toads" was published in 1955 in a collection of Larkin's poems titled "The Less Deceived." He later published a follow up poem title "Toads Revisited."

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore