Q:

Why is the moon called a natural satellite?

A:

A moon is considered a natural satellite because it orbits around a planet. A natural satellites is any celestial object that orbits around another larger object.

Know More

Full Answer

Mercury and Venus are the only planets in the solar system that do not have natural satellites. The Earth's only natural satellite is the Moon. The Moon orbits around the Earth once every 27.3 days, which is the sidereal period, but because the Earth is moving around the Sun, the synodic period is about 29.5 days. The moon is held in orbit by gravity. Objects such as planets, asteroids, and comets orbit around stars and are also considered natural satellites.

Learn more in Our Moon

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a third quarter moon?

    A:

    A third quarter moon, sometimes called a last quarter moon, occurs about three weeks after a new moon. The moon reflects light from the sun with varying degrees of illumination during different phases.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why is it called a "full moon"?

    A:

    The moon is called a "full moon" when it is fully illuminated and appears to be round from the perspective of the earth. A full moon occurs when the moon is on the opposite side of the earth from the sun.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How big is the moon?

    A:

    Earth's sole natural satellite, the moon, has a circumference of 6,783.5 miles around its equator. Its surface area is 14,647,439.75 square miles, which is approximately 0.07 times that of the Earth.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How old is the moon?

    A:

    The scientific consensus is that the Earth's moon formed four and half billion years ago. About 100 million years after the formation of the solar system, another small planet is likely to have collided with the Earth, resulting in the formation of the Moon.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore