Q:

If we move a conductor through a magnetic field, what will we create?

A:

Moving a conductor through a magnetic field creates an induced voltage. The voltage that is generated in the conductor is called the induced electromotive force (EMF). The induced EMF is higher if the movement of the conductor, within the magnetic flux, is faster; this is called Faraday’s Law.

Induced EMF becomes zero when the movement of the conductor stops. The induced voltage is observed to be larger if the magnetic field, conductor motion and the conductor are perpendicular to each other. The copper wire, a conductor, contains free electrons. The movement of the conductor allows these electrons, to arrive at one side of it, leaving the other side positively charged. Hence, a voltage is developed by the separation of charges.

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