Q:

What does a new moon look like?

A:

Quick Answer

A new moon is not visible. During a new moon, the moon passes between the Earth and the sun. The part of the moon that is lit is facing the sun and not the Earth.

Know More

Full Answer

The lunar cycle starts with a new moon. During a new moon, the side of the moon facing the Earth is not receiving any sunlight, so it appears black. The moon only reflects whatever light shines upon it. If no light is shining on it, then the moon cannot reflect any light. The only time the new moon is visible is during a solar eclipse, when the sun's corona shines around the outline of the moon. The new moon is not visible because it rises and sets with the sun and is eclipsed by the sun's brightness.

Learn more about Our Moon

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the surface of the moon like?

    A:

    The moon's surface is solid and rocky, covered with many small and large craters caused by impacts. The lunar surface also consists of mountains, massive rocks and cracks that may have formed from lava flow. The moon is also covered in a whitish-gray ground-up rock called regolith.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Where is the moon located?

    A:

    The moon is located an average of 238,855 miles from the Earth, according to Space.com. Because its orbit is irregular, its closest approach to the Earth is 225,700 miles while at its farthest, the moon is 252,000 miles from the Earth.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is a Black Moon?

    A:

    A black moon describes either the second new moon of a calendar month, a calendar month without a new moon, a calendar month without a full moon, or the third new moon of a season that has four new moons.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What color is the moon?

    A:

    The surface of the moon is generally a light gray color, although there are parts of the moon that are made up of dark gray rocks. The moon has a different appearance from the surface, from space and from the Earth.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore