Q:

What is Newton's first law of motion?

A:

Newton's First Law of Motion defines the concept of inertia. The law states that an object will remain in its original state of motion until acted upon by an outside force.

Newton's Three Laws of Motion are used to define principles that are fundamental to the field of physics. First presented in 1686, these laws demonstrate the basic concepts that define the motion of all physical objects. The law of inertia contains implications regarding the symmetry of the universe; this can be applied to everything from the most basic movement of simple objects to more advanced concepts such as aerodynamics.


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