Q:

When is the next red moon?

A:

Quick Answer

As of September 2014, there are three more blood moons expected to occur within the next two years. They are predicted to occur on Oct. 8, 2014, April 4, 2015, and Sept. 28, 2015.

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When is the next red moon?
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Full Answer

The 2014 and 2015 blood moons occur during a series of four lunar eclipses. The series of four total lunar eclipses is known as a tetrad. When the moon passes through Earth's shadow, the moon takes on red light taken in by the Earth from sunrises and sunsets. CNN reports that, according to NASA, the color of the moon during an eclipse depends on what is in Earth's atmosphere at the time.


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