Q:

What object weights one ton?

A:

Fully grown brown bears and polar bears weigh approximately 1 ton. There are many different animals and objects that can weigh 1 ton. In 2012, a pumpkin grown by a farmer in Rhode Island weighed just over 1 ton, coming in at 2,009 pounds.

In general, 1 ton is said to equal 2,000 pounds, but some countries outside the United States consider 1 ton to equal 2,240 pounds. The 2,000-pound ton is sometimes referred to as a "short" ton, while the 2,240-pound ton is called the "long" ton. In comparison, most cars weigh approximately 1/2 ton, and a fully grown elephant can top 7 tons.


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