Q:

What is one bar of pressure?

A:

One bar is a measure of atmospheric pressure that is equal to the pressure felt at sea level on Earth. It has largely replaced the older unit of one atmosphere, which is equal to 1.013 bar.

As of 2014, the bar is only partially integrated into the metric system, as the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry has defined 1 bar as being exactly equal to 100,000 pascals. The bar, and the smaller millibar, are most commonly used in meteorology and for industrial applications like the calibration of hydraulics. The bar is recognized for official use by the European Union, though the International Astronomical Union prefers the use of kilopascals and megapascals.


Is this answer helpful?

Similar Questions

  • Q:

    What weighs one ton?

    A:

    The leatherback sea turtle, the largest turtle on Earth, can weigh up to 2,000 pounds, or 1 ton. Leatherbacks are the only sea turtles to have a leathery, rather than bony, carapace.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you convert atm to kPa?

    A:

    The unit symbol "atm" refers to units of atmospheric pressure found at sea level on the planet earth, and "kPa," or kilopascals, are smaller units of pressure, each of which is 1000 pascals. To convert from atm to kPa, you would need a calculator for precise measurements, or you can make a close estimate without one.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How heavy is water?

    A:

    At sea level, 1 liter of water weighs 1 kilogram. At higher temperatures, there are fewer water molecules in a given volume and water is less dense, so 1 liter of water weighs slightly less than 1 kilogram.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is height above sea level?

    A:

    Height above sea level is the elevation of land above the local mean sea level. Sea level is used as the base level for measuring depth and elevation on Earth. Temperature, gravity, winds, currents and river discharges affect sea levels.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore