Q:

What is the only continent on Earth without an active volcano?

A:

Australia is the only continent without an active volcano. There are two active volcanoes off the continent of Australia but still within Australian territory. They are located on Heard Island and on the McDonald Islands.

Australia does not have any active volcanoes because it does not have plate boundaries. There is evidence of historical volcanic activity throughout Australia, with much of the activity having taken place along the east coast of the continent. The volcanic activity is thought to have happened sometime in the past 60 million years. In general, volcanoes are said to be extinct once they have been inactive for at least 10,000 years.

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