Q:

What is the only movable joint of the skull?

A:

BBC states that the only movable joint on the skull is part of the mandible, or the lower jaw bone. According to the University of Washington School of Medicine, the joint formed around the mandible is known as the temporomandibular joint.

When the temporomandibular joint moves, it forms two movements: a horizontal rotation around the joint's fixture, and an anterior translation that allows the jaw to open fully. The temporomandibular joint is named for the two bones that connect via the joint: the temporal bone, which is attached to the skull, and the mandible, which is the movable lower jaw bone.

Learn More
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the hardest bone in the body?

    A:

    The hardest bone in the human body is the mandible, which is more commonly known as the jawbone. This bone is also the largest and strongest bone in the human face. The jawbone sits in the lower portion of the face and holds the bottom teeth in place. It connects to the skull behind the ears.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the function of the skull?

    A:

    The main and overall function of the skull is to protect the brain and sensory organs and supportĀ facial structures. Individual bones within the structure of the skull take on other and more specific roles.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How thick is the human skull?

    A:

    The thickness of the average human skull depends on a number of factors, including gender. The average skull thickness for men is .25 inches, and the average for women is .28 inches.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some examples of a gliding joint?

    A:

    Some examples of a gliding joint are the joints located in the wrists, ankles and spine. Gliding joints, also called plane joints, connect two bone plates that glide past or against each other to facilitate movement. A hand waving from side-to-side is one example of the use of gliding joints.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore