Q:

What are the organs in the right hypochondriac region?

A:

The organs of the right hypochondrial region include the liver, gall bladder, kidney, small intestine and large intestine. Some of these organs, such as the kidney and intestines, are only partially located within this region.

The liver occupies the most space in the right hypochondrial region. It has many functions, including the detoxification of blood, storage of vitamins and control of the production and storage of cholesterol. The liver can carry out these functions even when 75 percent of it has been damaged or destroyed.

The liver also produces bile, which is stored in the gall bladder. Bile is released into the duodenum to aid in the breakdown and absorption of fats.

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