Q:

Why do people no longer hear sonic booms?

A:

Quick Answer

Sonic booms are rarely heard because they are produced by jets exceeding the speed of sound, and jets are no longer permitted to reach those speeds. Jets flying at certain speeds create sound waves, which are classified as sonic booms when jets exceed the speed of sound. Sonic booms are audible to humans and may be powerful enough to rattle or break windows.

Know More
Why do people no longer hear sonic booms?
Credit: Jerry Gunner CC-BY 2.0

Full Answer

Sonic booms are easy to hear, but cannot be observed by the naked eye. As with other types of sound waves, sonic booms are generally only seen in photographs taken with sophisticated cameras. Sonic booms vary in duration and intensity. Generally, the largest and fastest objects produce the largest sonic booms after breaking the sound barrier.

Learn more in Motion & Mechanics
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What factors affect the speed of sound?

    A:

    The speed of sound is influenced by several factors, including medium, density and temperature. The rate at which sound waves moves varies widely from one situation to the next and can change dramatically in a short period of time.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What speed breaks the sound barrier?

    A:

    Breaking the sound barrier requires exceeding the speed of sound, which is approximately 761 miles per hour at seal level when the air temperature is 59 degrees Fahrenheit. As the temperature decreases, the speed of sound also decreases.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How fast is Mach 1?

    A:

    In aeronautics, the Mach number M is the ratio between the speed of an object moving through a medium and the speed of sound of that medium. Mach 1 represents the speed of sound in air, which is approximately 330 meters per second, or 760 miles per hour.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Why can we sometimes hear noises in the stomach during digestion?

    A:

    Bowel sounds are often heard as food moves through the intestines because the intestines are hollow and the noise from this movement can echo throughout the abdomen, according to MedlinePlus. Growling noises can be heard coming from the stomach after eating as well. The Mayo Clinic explains, as hunger triggers muscle contractions and the release of acids and digestive fluids that causes the audible rumbling noise.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore