Q:

What is a person who studies insects called?

A:

A person who studies insects is called an entomologist. An entomologist is a scientist who studies the ecology, classification, behavior, life cycle, population and physiology of insects. These scientists work with different insects such as honeybees, silkworms and ladybird beetles to understand the benefits the insects offer humans.

Entomologists also study urban, agricultural and veterinary pests. These scientists are commonly employed as researchers, teachers and consultants. Entomologists may work for private businesses, government agencies or universities. Researchers study insects to understand anatomy, habits and physiology. This information provides classification and identification standards that are used to answer questions or solve problems related to different species.


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