Q:

What is the pH of baking soda?

A:

Quick Answer

Baking soda has a pH of 8.3. This compound, also called sodium bicarbonate, is made up of sodium, hydrogen, carbon and oxygen. Baking soda is classified as a weak base, which means it does not completely ionize in water.

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What is the pH of baking soda?
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Full Answer

Manufacturers produce baking powder by mixing baking soda and cream of tartar. When the two ingredients are dry, they do not react with each other. When a baker adds liquid to the baking powder, however, the baking soda and cream of tartar enter into a chemical reaction. This reaction produces carbon dioxide gas, which is what makes baked goods rise. This is an example of a weak base reacting with a weak acid, according to C.R. Nave of Georgia State University.

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