Q:

What is the pH of hydrochloric acid?

A:

The pH of hydrochloric acid is 0, which means that it has the highest degree of acidity on the pH scale. Hydrochloric acid is a clear and highly corrosive solution of hydrogen chloride in water. In addition to its many industrial uses, hydrochloric acid is also found naturally in the digestive system in the form of gastric acid.

The pH scale ranges between 0 and 14. Neutral pH is represented by 7, which would be that of distilled water. Those pH levels above 7 and up to 14 are the readings that would be obtained from those substances termed bases. A pH reading of 14 represents the highest degree of alkalinity, a term used to describe the relative strength of a base.


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  • Q:

    What is the pH level of hydrochloric acid?

    A:

    The pH of hydrochloric acid is 0. This reading is taken from a solution of 1 mole of hydrochloric acid. A less concentrated solution of the acid, such as a 0.5-mole solution, has a higher pH, meaning it would be less acidic.

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    Why is the pH of distilled water not 7.0?

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    Distilled water tends to test between 7.0 and 6.8 on the pH scale because water exposed to the open air absorbs carbon dioxide and becomes more acidic.

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    What is hydrochloric acid used for?

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