Q:

What is the pH level of sugar?

A:

Quick Answer

The pH level of sugar is 7 because sugar is neutral. The pH of any substance that is neither an acid nor base is 7.

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What is the pH level of sugar?
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Full Answer

There are several other foods that are listed in the neutral category and also have a pH of 7. These include milk, vegetable oil and butter. The pH of other foods varies widely and depends on if the food is an alkali-forming food or an acid-forming food. For example, alkali foods, such as soy beans and lima beans, both have a pH of 12. Acid-forming foods, such as organ meat, liver and chicken, all have a pH of 3.

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Related Questions

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    What is the pH level of lemon juice?

    A:

    The pH level of lemon juice is 2.0. The pH scale is used to measure how acidic or alkaline/base a solution is. The pH scale runs from 0 to 14; a pH of 7 is neutral, a pH lower than 7 is acidic and higher than 7 is alkaline.

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  • Q:

    What is a neutral pH level?

    A:

    A neutral pH level is a value of seven on the pH scale. This number lies at the center of the scale and is the value that is associated with pure water. A pH level below or above seven indicates that the liquid is either an acid or a base.

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    How do you find the pH level of solution?

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    To find the pH of a solution, calculate the concentration of hydronium ions present in the solution. Water dissociates into a hydronium ion and hydrogen oxide. The pH level can be calculated using the expression pH= -log (H3O).

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    What is the pH level of bleach?

    A:

    Bleach has a pH value of around 12 or 13. The pH scale is used as a measure of the acidity or basicity of solutions in which the solvent is water. Solutions with a pH value of 7 or less are acidic, while those above this number are basic.

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