Q:

Which planet rotates on its side?

A:

Quick Answer

Uranus orbits the sun tilted on its side. This  planet is composed mainly of the gases helium, hydrogen and methane. Its bluish-green color is due to the presence of methane.  

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Full Answer

Scientists believe that Uranus's tilt, which is approximately 98 degrees, was caused by a collision with an object that was possibly as large as the Earth.

Discovered in 1781 by William Herschel, Uranus  has 27 known moons and 13 rings. Some of its bigger moons are Titania, Oberon, Miranda and Ariel. The minimum temperature of this planet can be as low as -224.2 degrees Celsius.  Its revolution  period is 84 Earth years.

Uranus is the only planet that has a name derived from a Greek god instead of a Roman deity. The Greek god's name was Ouranus.

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