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What makes plant and animal cells different?

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There are several key differences between plant and animal cells, such as cell wall structure, presence or absence of plastids, lysosomes and centrioles and shape of vacuoles. These characteristics are the primary and most distinct differences between plant and animal cells. However, they only exist in organisms classified as eukaryotic, and occur primarily in central organelles.

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What makes plant and animal cells different?
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Cell wall structure varies considerably between plant and animal cells. In plant cells, walls have shape but lack a clearly defined and rigid structure; biologists refer to this as having nearly-present walls. Animal cells, on the other hand, have no cell walls present outside their cell membranes. In plant cells, plastids are located in the cytoplasm while animal cells lack plastids. Most animal cells contain lysosomes, which are located primarily in their cytoplasms. Plant cells do not typically have lysosomes; if they do, those structures are also located in their cytoplasms. Organelles called centrioles occur in some plant cells, but are only found in cells of lower plant varieties. Centrioles are found in all animal cells, however. The last primary difference between plant and animal cells is that all plant cells contain structures called vacuoles, which are filled with gel-like cell sap. Some animal cells contain vacuoles, too; if present, those vacuoles are temporary or small and contractile.

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Related Questions

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    What do plant and animal cells have in common?

    A:

    Plant and animal cells both have a nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, ribosomes, a Golgi apparatus, vesicles, mitochondria and a cell membrane. Each of these components work together to keep the cell healthy and functioning properly. In addition, plant and animal cells are eukarotic, meaning they are multicellular.

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    What are the differences between plant and animal cells?

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    There are many differences between plant and animal cells, but one of the most obvious differences is that plant cells have a cell wall. Animal cells do not have a cell wall.

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    How do plant and animal cells differ?

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    Plant cells differ from animal cells in their possession of chloroplasts, a cell wall, a large central vacuole and their relative lack of an internal cytoskeleton. Plant cells gain their form and rigidity from the pressure of their large, water-filled vacuoles against their tough cellulose cell walls. Animal cells must rely on protein-based skeletal structures within the cell to maintain their shape.

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    How does cytokinesis differ in animal and plant cells?

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    Cytokinesis is accomplished in animal cells by a narrowing cleavage furrow that pulls inward and eventually splits the cell, while plant cells divide through the formation of a new cell wall that grows outward from the central portion of the cell. Because animal cells have a movable plasma membrane instead of the stiff outer cell wall which plant cells possess, the cleavage furrow can easily pull inward until the cell is physically split. A plant cell's stiff outer wall, however, does not permit this type of pliability, and requires the construction of a new cell wall to divide.

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