Q:

What plants live in the Atlantic Ocean?

A:

The types of plants that are predominantly found in the Atlantic Ocean include kelp and phytoplanktons. The Atlantic Ocean is part of the marine biome that encompasses around 70 percent of the planet.

Scientists estimate that the Earth's oceans contain more than 10 million species of flora and fauna, 9 million of which are still undiscovered. The most important plants that inhabit the oceans are the marine algae, which are the primary producers of oxygen essential for an organism's survival. Kelp forests are commonly found at the bottom of ocean floors  where barnacles, sponges, starfish, clams and sea-anemones live. Phytoplanktons, such as diatoms, coccolithophores, cyanobacteria and dinoflagellates, are abundant in cooler, mid-latitude regions, particularly in the north Atlantic Ocean.

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