Q:

Are plants prokaryotic or eukaryotic?

A:

Plants are eukaryotes, with their DNA contained in a membrane-bound nucleus along with other membrane-bound organelles, such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and vacuoles. Their chloroplasts give them the ability to generate energy and carbohydrates from water, sunlight and carbon dioxide.

Plants are one of the groups of multicellular eukaryotes with cell walls. The other are fungi. Unlike fungi, plants' cell walls are composed of cellulose. Together with pressure in their extremely large central vacuoles, these cell walls let them keep their shape, unlike animal cells that rely on internal protein skeletons to maintain their shape. Plant cells lack the centrioles and lysosomes found in animal cells.


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